For Appointments: 0877 - 6690000, 7993933777

Toll Free No: 1800-208-6777

For Appointments: 0877 - 6690000,
7993933777

Toll Free No: 18002086777

The MRI examination is performed in a special room that houses the MR system or “scanner”. You will be escorted into the room by a staff member of the MRI facility and asked to lie down on a comfortably padded table that gently glides you into the scanner.

In general, in preparation for the MRI examination, you may be required to wear earplugs or headphones to protect your hearing because, when certain scanners operate, they may produce loud noises. These loud noises are normal and should not worry you.

For some MRI studies, a contrast agent called “gadolinium” may be injected into a vein to help obtain a clearer picture of the area being examined. At some point during the examination, a nurse or technologist will slide the table out of the scanner in order to inject the contrast agent. This is typically done through a small needle connected to an intravenous line that is placed in an arm or hand vein. A saline solution will drip through the intravenous line to prevent clotting until the contrast material is injected at some point during the exam. Unlike contrast agents used in x-ray studies, MRI contrast agents do not contain iodine and, therefore, rarely cause allergic reactions or other problems.

The most important thing for the patient to do is to relax and lie still. Most MRI exams take between 25 to 45 minutes to complete depending on the body part imaged and how many images are needed, although some may take as long as 60-minutes or longer. You’ll be told ahead of time just how long your scan is expected to take.

You will be asked to remain perfectly still during the time the imaging takes place, but between sequences some minor movement may be allowed. The MRI Technologist will advise you, accordingly.

When MRI procedure begins, you may breathe normally, however, for certain examinations it may be necessary for you to hold your breath for a short period of time.

During your MRI examination, the MR system operator will be able to speak to you, hear you, and observe you at all times. Consult the scanner operator if you have any questions or feel anything unusual.

When the MRI procedure is over, you may be asked to wait until the images are examined to determine if more images are needed. After the scan, you have no restrictions and can go about your normal activities.

Once the entire MRI examination is completed, the pictures will be looked at by a radiologist, a specially-trained physician who is able to interpret the scans for your doctor. The radiologist will give reports, most of the times before four hours / next day morning for after 4pm MRI cases. You should contact your doctor to go over your results and discuss your next step.